abril 25, 2024

I’m at a point in my life where I’m team stools over chairs, and I truly believe stools deserve to be given way more credit than they get. Stools are often overlooked, maybe because they occupy minimum space, and aren’t really overbearing. But these traits are what make stools so great in my opinion! I mean, they’re compact, and a great space-saving furniture option for our modern homes. They are also super portable. And, we’ve put together a collection of stool designs that not only provide a healthy seating experience while promoting a good and stable posture but most of them are created from sustainable materials as well. From a minimal stackable stool with slim wooden legs to a rustic stool made using leftover grain from beer – these well-designed stools are the furniture pieces you need to add to your home.

1. Drum Stool

This minimal, stackable, and sustainable stool is called the Drum Stool! When you first look at the Drum Stool it looks like an adorable little wine cork, but as you dig deeper, you realize it has much more to offer.

Why is it noteworthy?

Teixeira picked materials such as cork and wood to build the stool, instantly rating it high on sustainability. Cork was used to create the seat, while wood was the material for the legs.

What we like

  • Equipped with round trimmed surfaces, giving it a rather fun and playful shape
  • The trimmed seat is further supported by slim wooden legs that effortlessly blend with the seat, creating a furniture piece with a cohesive and harmonious personality

What we dislike

  • We’re not sure how comfy the trimmed cork seat would be to sit on for longer durations of time

2. S1 Stool

Designed by Australian designer Alexander Lotersztain for the furniture brand Derlot, the minimalist and simple S1 stool doubles up as a handy side table!

Why is it noteworthy?

The stool/side table has a simple form that is inspired by an I-beam, which is a structural member with an I-shaped cross-section. The S1 stool is ideal for both indoor and outdoor use, owing to its versatile form and universal design.

What we like

  •  Available in three heights to maximize its versatility

What we dislike

  • Aesthetics are simple and unassuming

3. Lift Stool

One look at the Lift Stool, and you’ll be completely mesmerized by its beautiful translucent texture, and the two lifted ends that seem to define the design. It’s completely unlike any stool I’ve seen, and with good reason.

Why is it noteworthy?

We often see lighting fixtures on walls that have been slightly lifted or exposed on one end to allow the light to flow more freely. These fixtures often lend an air of fascination and mystery to the room they’re placed in, and SUNRIU Design attempted to capture the same sensation.

What we like

  •  Makes for a great lounging spot for your cat

What we dislike

  • It’s a concept, so we don’t know how the actual product will turn out to be

4. Mosquito Barstool

Say hello to the peculiarly named ‘Mosquito Barstool’! The original Mosquito chair was designed by mid-century designer and architect Niko Kralj and Slovenian brand Rex Kralj has reimagined it as a contemporary wooden bar stool.

Why is it noteworthy?

The Mosquito Bar Stool has the same plywood seat as the 1953 Mosquito Chair, which was one of its distinguished features. This seat has a unique and signature “winged form” that mimics the bodies of the flying insects, hence giving the stool its quirky name.

What we like

  • Inspired by a 1950s furniture design

What we dislike

  • The aesthetics may be too traditional and old-fashioned for some

5. The Arc Stool

The Arc Stool is a simple but wonderfully and thoughtfully designed stool that can add manifolds of elegance and personality to your living space.

Why is it noteworthy?

The stool is a typically humble item, however, the Arc Stool attempts to elevate and upgrade this rather mundane furniture piece. It is a signature piece of the inaugural collection by the US studio Juntos.

What we like

  • The dipped surface adds comfort for the sitter
  • Extremely easy to pick up and move

What we dislike

  • No options for customization or personalization

6. Superpop Tables

Designed by Italian designer Paolo Cappello for Miniforms, the Superpop tables feature colorful, terrazzo-like surfaces created from recycled plastic.

Why is it noteworthy?

The tables are super versatile, and what’s even more interesting is that they can be used as coffee tables, side tables, or even stools! They are sustainable, versatile, lightweight, and fun.

What we like

  • Have a universe appeal and versatile functionality
  • Bring a festive atmosphere to any space they are placed into

What we dislike

  • Could be difficult to match them with the interior styles of different homes

7. Mask Stool

Dubbed the Mask Stool, this unique stool is made using spent grain from brewery Carlsberg’s beer production at the Danish film festival 3 Days of Design.

Why is it noteworthy?

The Mask Stool is built using a sustainable design technology that Mater developed. Mater developed this technology alongside the Danish Technological Institute and the University of Copenhagen. The technology merges and mixes fiber-based materials with plastic waste.

What we like

  • Utilizes an innovative new sustainable technology

What we dislike

  • The aesthetics of the stool are quite odd-looking, and may not be appreciated by everyone

8. Balanco Stools

Designed during the pandemic, the Balanco stools are inspired by rocks and boulders, and they’re meant for adults and kids to play and engage with.

Why is it noteworthy?

The idea for the Balanco stools came from the Japanese practice of stacking pebbles to create towers. Traditionally, the pebbles mostly consist of rounded forms, designers Lisa Lai and Joel Wong decided that chiseled rock-like shapes would create more visual dynamism while offering a variety of flat surfaces that are ideal for stacking and layering.

What we like

  • Extremely light
  • Inspired by rocks and boulders

What we dislike

  • Made from felt, there is a higher chance of staining this design

9. Tie Stool

The Tie Stool is made up of three bent plywood strips that effortlessly lock into one another, creating a tripod form that is comfortable to sit down on. Besides its unique design, the sheer simplicity of the stool, and the use of minimal materials make the stool quite a beauty.

Why is it noteworthy?

Fabricating the Tie Stool would require a few simple steps. The three plywood strips can, in fact, be split into 6 total parts (you can see the parting lines). The individual parts are formed using high pressure and temperatures that cause the plywood to bend and retain its shape, and cutting/finishing processes are performed on the parts to make them interlock into one another.

What we like

  • The entire stool can potentially be flat-packed and shipped to customers
  • It’s stackable

What we dislike

  • Its compressed design means it needs a tabletop to add more space on the stool

10. The Rook Stool

Designed by Australian designer Ross Gardam, the Rook Stool draws inspiration from chess pieces! Available in three types of solid wood, if you look closely at the stool, you’ll find deft and interesting similarities to the pieces you find on a chess board.

Why is it noteworthy?

The designer drew references from the shapes of decorative wooden chess pieces for the Rook Stool. The stool utilizes simple elements that have been placed at unusual but intriguing angles and intersections to create a sculptural appeal.

What we like

  • Available in various wood options so you can take your pick

What we dislike

  • Doesn’t look too comfy to sit on for long durations of time

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